UCLIC Research Seminar Series

UCLIC Research Seminar 30th January: Leigh Clark (University College Dublin) on "Mapping Speech Research in HCI: Trends, Themes and Challenges"
Dr Leigh Clark, Univerity College Dublin, Ireland

Title

UCLIC Research Seminar 30th January: Leigh Clark (University College Dublin) on "Mapping Speech Research in HCI: Trends, Themes and Challenges"

Abstract

Speech interfaces are growing in popularity and while their technical underpinnings are well documented, less is understood about the user side in the HCI field. This talk presents work from a review of 68 research papers on speech interfaces in HCI, where the trends, themes, findings and methods in the field are mapped out. Findings show most studies are usability/theory-focused or explore wider system experiences, evaluating Wizard of Oz, prototypes, or developed systems by using self-report questionnaires to measure concepts like usability and user attitudes. A thematic analysis of the research found that speech HCI work focuses on nine key topics: system speech production, modality comparison, user speech production, assistive technology & accessibility, design insight, experiences with interactive voice response systems (IVRS), using speech technology for development, people's experiences with intelligent personal assistants (IPAs) and how user memory affects speech interface interaction. From these insights, key gaps and challenges are identified and are presented in light of ongoing work at the HCI@UCD research group.

Biography

Dr. Leigh Clark is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the School of Information and Communication Studies at University College Dublin. His research examines the communicative aspects of user interactions with speech interfaces, how context impacts perceptions of computer speech and how linguistic theories can be implemented and redefined in speech-based HCI. Dr. Clark obtained his PhD from the University of Nottingham, focusing on the effects of computers using politeness and vague language in towards its users. He is also a member of the HCI@UCD research group and the ADAPT Centre based in Dublin.