UCLIC Research Seminar Series

UCLIC Research Seminar 6th of February: Youngjun Cho (UCL) on Physiological Computing towards Mental Disability Innovation
Youngjun Cho, UCL

Title

UCLIC Research Seminar 6th of February: Youngjun Cho (UCL) on Physiological Computing towards Mental Disability Innovation

Abstract

Physiological computing is an emerging research area enabling technologies to listen to our bodily functions and psychological needs. This talk provides an overview of my computational works in this area, summarised by three key components: physiological sensing, automatic affect recognition, and feedback. In particular, we will explore latest technologies for physiological sensing and mental stress detection in a contactless manner using mobile, low-cost thermal imaging. This overcomes limitations of existing non-contact physiological and stress detection systems that constrain one's mobility and environmental conditions, in turn helping deploy them in real world contexts. During the last minute of the talk, I will briefly talk about some of our ongoing work in physiological computing to accelerate mental disability/health innovation.

Biography

Youngjun is a lecturer in the department of computer science at UCL (GDI & UCLIC). He explores, builds and evaluates novel techniques and technologies for the next generation of physiological computing and AI that boost disability technology innovation. In his PhD research at UCL, he had investigated mobile thermal imaging-based physiological sensing and automated stress detection. Before deciding to undertake his PhD study in 2015, he had worked as a senior researcher at LG Electronics (full-time: 2011-2015, leave of absence:2015-2018) and was a PI/Co-I/Lead researcher of a variety of industrial research projects. Amongst his contributions, novel 3D input and gesture recognition technologies (as advanced touch screen solutions in vehicles) were successfully commercialised in collaboration with automobile manufacturers including Porsche and BMW. He has authored more than 50 articles (including patents) in areas related to physiological computing, machine learning, human-computer interaction and multimodal sensing and feedback. Some of the achievements have been featured in forums for the general public such as BBC News, Phys.Org, Imaging and Machine Vision Europe, Science Daily, and SBS News.