UCLIC Research Seminar Series

UCLIC Research Seminar 9th of October: Jo Vermeulen (Aarhus University) on "Explainable AI – What can we do as HCI researchers?"
Jo Vermeulen, Aarhus University

Title

UCLIC Research Seminar 9th of October: Jo Vermeulen (Aarhus University) on "Explainable AI – What can we do as HCI researchers?"

Abstract

We increasingly encounter technology that uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML). AI and ML are used to process sensor data from our devices and support advanced features of various services that we use every day. Algorithmic decision-making also affects people when they are not directly interacting with an interface, for example, when they experience the consequences of AI and ML use to assist decision-making for urban planning, disease diagnosis, or insurance risk prediction. Making AI explainable is widely seen as a core societal challenge for the future. In this talk, I'll discuss what we, as HCI researchers, can do to address this challenge. Based on a large-scale literature analysis, I discuss trends in explainable systems across different scientific communities, and identify new directions and implications for HCI research towards this goal. Finally, I will provide an outlook towards designing future technology that both empowers people and keeps them in the loop.

Biography

Jo Vermeulen is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Computer Science at Aarhus University in Denmark. His research interests lie at the intersection of human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing and information visualization. He strongly believes in designing interactive technology that puts people back in control of their digital environments. His research received several awards, including the 2015 FWO - IBM Innovation Award for his PhD dissertation, a Best Paper award at DIS 2014 and a Best Paper Honorable Mention award at CHI 2013. Previously, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Calgary (Canada) and at the University of Birmingham (UK). He holds a PhD in Computer Science from Hasselt University in Belgium.